The 10% Braver Multiplier Effect

Just over a year ago I went to my first WomenEd Unconference. I was nervous, I knew no one in the community and I didn’t quite know what I was doing there, going for, or looking for. I met a wonderful community of women and men who were just interested in the female perspective. But the one message that stood out above all else was the call to all attending or viewing online to be 10% Braver.

I carried that message home with me and rather than looking at all the things I wanted to do, I took the decision to spend some time thinking about where I had not been showing up. I have climbed up the career ladder in education fairly quickly so to speak, and deep down I know I thought I didn’t deserve to be there, in the Leadership meetings, presenting at Board level, none of it. Deep down I believed I hadn’t earned the stripes so therefore didn’t speak up in an authentic way, scared to be found out or busted. Not immediately, but eventually I worked on myself to ensure I did show up to work as my authentic self this meant I wouldn’t tolerate the bullying that sometimes went on in leadership meetings no matter how subtle, that I would entertain alternative points of view even if they were ridiculed because to entertain them, that was what mattered. To weigh up the credibility of ideas not natural to us is what makes us rational humans. I had frank conversations with my managers about what I needed and what I felt was missing to take the school to a better place.

Eventually I left my place of work and was brave enough to apply for a promotion at a new school as a Vice Principal and got it. But this isn’t about my successes through being brave but what it has allowed me to pass on. Because by showing up, whole, flaws and all, I have allowed others to do the same including, and I believe most importantly, my students.

This is why I thought it was important to tell them I was going for a VP interview before I did, no matter what the outcome. That one act meant I had a Year 13 student knock on my door with the usual prologue that women use before they dare ‘I know this is stupid but….’ She was entertaining the idea of applying for an apprenticeship at Google something she thought was completely out of her reach. I encouraged her to go ahead anyway. Do it anyway. Dream it anyway. I’m am pleased to say she is in London right now as a Google Apprentice.

One of my favourite acts of courage by my class was with a Year 13 group as we approached their final exams. I asked them all to be honest and share a concept /model or word they didn’t still didn’t understand. As a result, one of my students said he had heard the term ‘Vice Versa’ throughout his education but had never known what the teachers meant. I’m proud to say that we all whooped for his bravery and I explained it to him. This led to other brave acts in the classroom. Quiet students making goodbye speeches at the end of the year in our final lesson. Students pushing to have their work shared with and critiqued by others in class.

Being braver (and reading a lot of books, thank you Brene Brown and Chase Jarvis!) has allowed me to encourage others to be brave too. Writing a blog has allowed me to encourage students with particular interests to start their own YouTube channels and not hide their light. Prepping for my book has allowed me to encourage my niece to pursue her dream as a writer.

I am by no means insinuating that I deserve any credit for the brave acts of the lovely young people I work with. What I am saying is courage breeds courage. Whether we want to accept the mantel or not, we are role models for our students. Our brave selves give them the courage to shine in all their glory also.

And the more whole and gutsy women and men we have, the better I say.

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